Children's Rights, Inclusion, Equality

A complex additional support needs strategy (overview)

The Scottish Government recently published “The Right Help at the Right time in the right place” – Scotland’s Ten Year Strategy for the Learning Provision for Children and Young People with Complex Additional Support Needs.

The Ten Years in question are 2017-2026, with the commencement of the strategy being taken as the date that a draft was published for consultation – which is an interesting approach!

There is no separate legal definition of the term “complex additional support needs” and (perhaps wisely) this strategy does not attempt to come up with a definition of its own.  Instead, there is a “working description” outlined on p9, which includes:

  1. children and young people with a Co-ordinated Support Plan (CSP);
  2. children and young people at stage 3 or 4 of an education authority’s staged intervention model;
  3. children or young people who attend a grant-aided or independent special school.

It is also worth noting the descending capitals in the title, with “Right Help” being followed by “Right time” before finally giving way to the “right place”.  Does this imply an order or priority or importance?  Or, am I reading too much into things?

Context for the strategy

This strategy fits within the Scottish vision for inclusive education, which reads:

Inclusive education in Scotland starts from the belief that education is a human right and the foundation for a more just society. An inclusive approach which recognises diversity and holds the ambition that all children and young people are enabled to achieve to their potential is the cornerstone to achieve equity and excellence in education for all of our children and young people.

Inclusive practice is defined by reference to four key features of inclusion:

  • Present;
  • Participating;
  • Achieving;
  • Supported

You’ll recognise these from the revised guidance on the presumption of mainstreaming.

The big question behind all of this is funding.  Specifically £11 million.  Which is what the Scottish Government currently spends on the grant-aided schools (Harmeny, East Park, Royal Blind School, Donaldson’s, Corseford, Stanmore House, and the Scottish Centre for Children with Motor Impairments (SCCMI)) and three national services (Enquire, CALL Scotland and the Scottish Sensory Centre).

The strategy is all about commissioning services, and seeks in particular to ensure that “the impact of any service commissioned results in capacity building across local authorities as well as at  national level,”.  This suggest a move away from funding schools, and towards funding research, professional development and outreach services.

Next Steps

To sit alongside this document, an Operational Commissioning Strategy is being prepared.  This will complement the Ten Year strategy, and is to be published  “in late 2019”.

The Commissioning process will have heavy involvement from the third sector who – it is anticipated – will take a lead in applying for funding and delivering services.  Other organisations or partnerships may also apply for funding.  Any change to the current funding arrangement will be introduced in such a way that it will not prejudice placements of children and young persons already support by the existing recipients of funding.

As I mentioned earlier, professional development may well be a key plank of this strategy as it is implemented.  Indeed, the strategy states that “By 2026 there should be a well-established national leadership programme at post-graduate level, which addresses the requirements of effective leadership in the context of schools and services for children and young people with complex additional support needs.”

Parental engagement

Parental engagement is also mentioned throughout the strategy.  A new resource “Supporting Disabled Children, Young People and their Families” was put out for consultation in April 2018, and highlights good practice on rights and information, accessibility of support, and transitions.

The Scottish Schools (Parental Involvement) Act 2006 places a specific duty on local authorities to consider how their parental involvement strategies make provision for parents of children with complex additional support need.  The Scottish Government will include specific guidance on this point as part of refreshed national guidance on parental involvement.

Children’s Rights

The strategy also makes passing reference to children’s rights, and expresses a desire that a positive culture, in which children are welcomed, nurtured, listened to, and have their views heard and their rights protected, is promoted in Scotland.

The changes to the Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004 for children aged 12-15 is highlighted, as is the children’s support service, My Rights, My Say.

A version of the strategy which is accessible for children and families will be made available in “late 2018”.

Transition Period

The proposal here is for a “phased release of funding from the current commitments”, with the grant-aided special schools potentially having to adapt to a new funding landscape in which they access funding on a different basis – or not at all.

An evaluation framework for the strategy is to be developed, with annual reporting against that framework from 2021.

Conclusion

Much detail still to follow, including the Operational Commissioning  Strategy and the practice of education authorities in commissioning in future.  Whether this will have an impact of statutory placing requests, or planning documents, for example, will remain to be seen.