Educational planning: CSP vs. Child’s Plan

In August 2016, Part 5 of the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014 will come into force, putting the “Child’s Plan” on a statutory footing.  In some quarters, this is seen as the cue to put away all those pesky Co-ordinated Support Plans (CSPs) in a drawer, lock it, and move on …

However, this is not the legal position.  In fact, the new law does not alter the status or effect of the CSP at all.  Article 3(2)(b)(ii) of the Child’s Plan (Scotland) Order 2016 require a Child’s Plan to record all the information set out in a CSP which is “a record of any wellbeing needs which the child has and any action taken or to be taken to address those needs” – or, in other words, most of it. Article 7(9)(b) effectively ties the review cycle of a Child’s Plan to that of the CSP.

And despite these (and other) legislative developments within this time, the CSP remains an important part of the education policy. The Scottish Government recently listed their
‘continued commitment’ to the additional support for learning legislative framework as the key commitment in the field of education, in their Draft Delivery Plan (2016–2020) for the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

From a dispute resolution point of view, for all its faults, the system of mediation, independent adjudication and the Additional Support Needs Tribunals for Scotland provide a more robust system than the system of complaints set up under the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014 (Part 4 and Part 5 Complaints) Order 2016.

Therefore, it would seem that there is life in the old CSP yet…

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One thought on “Educational planning: CSP vs. Child’s Plan

  1. Linda Wilson

    Thank goodness for your website! I have been searching the internet all day, including Scottish Government and other websites to try and ascertain whether a Child Plan negates the need for a CSP. It would appear that the CSP is still the best legal tool for securing support. Thanks for your excellent article about the latest legislation.

    Like

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