Additional Support Needs Update (Issue 8)

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This edition looks at Angela Morgan’s ASL review, and the Scottish Government / CoSLA response to its recommendations. There’s also an updated guide to the changes to the law brought about as part of the Scottish Government’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic. 

The support spotlight this edition looks at an excellent new blog from a young man with dyspraxia. You should go and take a look at the Dyspraxic Den.

Do let me know what you think about the newsletter in the comments.

Additional Support Needs Update (Issue 8) – PDF

Image by Tumisu from Pixabay

Potential Energy (Part 5)

Theme 4 of the ASL Review is on resources. The remit of the review specifically stated that it was to consider implementation “within existing resources”. The review report, therefore, “includes limited comment on resources”, deferring more detailed consideration of this key issue to the forthcoming Audit Scotland thematic review of Additional Support for Learning.

Having said all of that, the review report still has much to say on the subject which is both perceptive and helpful.

Continue reading “Potential Energy (Part 5)”

ASL Review Action Plan published

The Scottish Government and COSLA have issued their action plan in response to the ASL Review today. You can read the action plan here: https://www.gov.scot/publications/additional-support-learning-action-plan/.

As you know, I am in the process of working my way through the review itself in detail, and will return to a detailed coverage of the action plan once that is complete.

However, in the meantime, a quick summary.

Almost all of the recommendations in the review are accepted, with one set of recommendations being partially accepted. True to form, there is much set out here which is already in place or underway. The first review of progress against the recommendations is due by October 2021.

Continue reading “ASL Review Action Plan published”

Potential Energy (Part 4)

Theme 3 of the Support for Learning review is “Maintaining focus, but overcoming fragmentation”.  It is a shorter section, covering only two A4 sheets, but addresses an important issue.  How do we ensure specialist knowledge and experience is available in the system for those who need it, without creating “silos” and giving the impression that additional support for learning is only for specialists?

Continue reading “Potential Energy (Part 4)”

Dyspraxia Awareness Week 2020

This week (4-10 October 2020) is Dyspraxia Awareness Week. According to the NHS, “Developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD), also known as dyspraxia, is a condition affecting physical co-ordination. It causes a child to perform less well than expected in daily activities for their age, and appear to move clumsily.”

It can also have a wider impact, affecting things like processing, short-term memory and spacial awareness.

Continue reading “Dyspraxia Awareness Week 2020”

Potential Energy (Part 3)

Following consideration of Theme 1: Vision and visibility, we turn our attention to Theme 2: Mainstreaming and inclusion. This obviously covers a lot of the same ground as the revised “Guidance on the presumption to provide education in a mainstreaming setting” on which I recently completed a ten-part series of blogs. You can read my conclusions on that guidance in Mainstreaming, I presume? (Part 10).

Thankfully, this review reaches many of the same conclusions about mainstreaming, and explicitly adopts many of the key concepts and principles from the guidance:

  • the review confirms that the “physical presence of a child” in a mainstream school alone does not constitute inclusion;
  • it adopts the four principles of inclusion from the guidance – present, participating, supported and achieving; and
  • it underlines the importance of inclusion “in the life of the school” which includes the playground, school trips, sporting events, social events and being “visible as part of the community”.

Continue reading “Potential Energy (Part 3)”

Potential Energy (Part 2)

Continuing our consideration of the ASL Review Report, the main section of the report begins with “Theme 1: Vision and visibility”.  This covers two big issues.  One is that there is no defining national agenda or narrative in relation to additional support needs, demonstrated perhaps by their absence from the National Improvement Framework.  The second is that the term “additional support needs” continues to be misunderstood and misinterpreted, with the result that particular groups of children and young people who are covered by the law missing out on their rights in practice.

Continue reading “Potential Energy (Part 2)”

Recover Version

Education Scotland have issued an update of their Corporate Plan for 2019-2022, to take account of the impact of the recent interruptions to learning caused by school closures etc.

The document is called “Education Scotland: Our Recovery Year 2020/21” which does sound like they are struggling with addiction or something.  To educational jargon perhaps?

It is a relatively short and easy to read document, which recognises that the pandemic has had “huge implications for the education system”. They propose therefore to “lead and support the [education] system during a ‘recovery year’ up to June 2021”.

While noting the changed context, there are some things which remain constant, including the commitment to Education Scotland’s four values (which I had not heard of before): integrity, respect, excellence and creativity. I might quibble over whether “excellence” is really a value, but there we are…

There is clearly some concern that we are not out of the woods yet, and so one of the aims is to “increase the system’s resilience to continue to support learning in the event of any future national or local lockdowns.” and one of the ES outcomes listed is that the “education system is responsive and able to move into / out of lockdown smoothly if / as required.”.

This is most obviously reflected in the commitment to “continue to develop support for remote learning”, with Glow, Scotland Learns and e-Sgoil being name-checked specifically.

To free up capacity, the school inspection programme remains “on hold” though “targeted and risk based inspections” will be carried out as required.

This is a corporate plan document, so it’s fairly high level stuff, and perhaps not wholly surprising to see no mention of the particular impact on pupils with additional support needs – though there is a recognition in the introduction that “the impact of COVID-19 has not been felt equally .. for our different groups of learners”.

Image by Jagrit Parajuli from Pixabay

Potential Energy (Part 1)

As promised, and following a delay (for which I apologise), I finally turn my attention to the independent review of the implementation of Additional Support for Learning legislation in Scotland.  The review was chaired by Angela Morgan, and the report, titled “Support for Learning: All our Children and All their Potential” was published in June 2020. A formal response from Scottish Government and COSLA is expected in the Autumn.

There has not been much in the way of commentary on the review, with this interesting article by Alison Brown being a rare example.

I plan to take the same approach as I did with the mainstreaming guidance, which is to consider the report in shorter chunks.  This keeps things manageable for me, and allows for a more in-depth analysis of each section. As always, my focus is on the legal implications.

Continue reading “Potential Energy (Part 1)”

Educational Continuity (Nos. 4 & 5) Directions

Due to being away on annual leave last week, I didn’t get a chance to blog on the last Educational Continuity Direction, which was the fourth issued by the Scottish Government.  It was not hugely exciting in that it mainly continued the previous directions, with some additional bits and bobs about preparing for schools re-opening on 11 August.  It also effectively brought to an end the provision of childcare for keyworker and vulnerable children, as of 31 July 2020.

But 5? Five! Well, this is the one we have been waiting for.  Issued on Thursday 6th August, but not coming into force until Monday 10th?  You know we’ve got something special on our hands.

For one thing, this direction is due to remain in place until 30th August 2020, and – as things stand – “it is not anticipated that a further direction will be required.”

As before, the direction applies only to education authority schools.  The main focus is now on the re-opening of schools, and the requirements are set out plainly:

  • schools may reopen to pupils from 11th August 2020;
  • schools must reopen to pupils by 18th August 2020;
  • authorities must prepare contingency plans to be used “immediately in the event of a local coronavirus outbreak”.

There are no specific requirements about steps to be taken for safety, but there is a general objective:

preventing the transmission of coronavirus, the welfare of children and young people and staff, and the importance of continuity of education.

And, as always, education authorities have to have regard to “relevant guidance issued by the Scottish Ministers” (of which there is no shortage).

And, contrary to expectations, there is no continuation of the disregard of failures in certain statutory duties – including key deadlines and duties within the additional support needs legislation.  Therefore, the period during which education authorities (and parents) may be able to rely on failures to comply with certain duties being disregarded is limited to the period from 2pm on 21 May 2020 until 1 minute past midnight on 10 August 2020 – and only insofar as it is the restrictions within the direction(s) which have led to the failure.

This means, of course, that in returning schools have all the same duties in place to make adequate and efficient provision for pupils’ additional support needs, and to make reasonable adjustments (including the provision of auxiliary aids and services) to avoid substantial disadvantage to disabled pupils.  Under the circumstances, there may well be significant needs to be met, and adjustments to be made.  The latest direction has effectively removed any “but the pandemic” excuse for disregarding those duties.

You can access all of the Educational Continuity Directions (and the accompanying guidance documents) on the Scottish Government educational continuity direction page.