Mainstreaming, I presume? (Part 6)

In this, the sixth part of a series on the Scottish Government (2019) Guidance on the presumption to provide education in a mainstream setting, we will be looking at the fourth and final of the “Key features of inclusion” : Supported.

Moral Support

In familiar style, the guidance sets out the key expectations:

  • All children and young people should benefit from the ethos and culture of the school, inclusive learning and teaching practices, and relationships
  • All children and young people should be given the right help, at the right time, from the right people, to support their wellbeing in the right place
  • All children and young people should be supported to participate in all parts of school life
  • All children and young people should be supported to overcome barriers to learning and achieve their full potential

It will, by now, be apparent that there is a substantial degree of overlap between the four key features of inclusion.  The content of the second bullet point (above) also echos the title of the recent strategy for complex additional support needs: “The Right Help at the Right time in the right place”.

Legal entitlements to support are found in the requirement to make “adequate and efficient provision” for a child or young person’s additional support needs (Section 4, Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004), and in the duty to make “reasonable adjustments” including the provision of “auxiliary aids and services” for disabled pupils (Section 20, Equality Act 2010).

The expectation that support is to be provided to enable participation in all parts of school life, is particularly welcome – as is the detailed explanation of the process by which this should take place:

To achieve their full potential, barriers to learning must be identified through robust assessment and addressed for all children and young people through the provision of flexible learning pathways and to enable them to participate in all parts of school life.

And, of course, parents, young persons and qualifying children (aged 12-15) have the right to request assessments (or examinations) where these may not otherwise have been forthcoming (Sections 8 & 8A, Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004).

So there you have it, the four key indicators of inclusion: present; participating; achieving and supported.

Next up we have Inclusive Practice …

One thought on “Mainstreaming, I presume? (Part 6)

  1. Pingback: Mainstreaming, I presume? (Part 7) – The Additional Support Needs Blog

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