Exclusion and disadvantage – a warning from London

An interesting and disturbing article I cam across recently in the Guardian: “Inner London students placed in excluded pupils’ schools almost double national rate” – which reveals statistics on exclusion from within London.

London’s schools are some of the highest performing in England and Wales, following the innovative London Challenge programme – which has in turn inspired the Scottish Government’s attainment challenge.

Research in London’s schools shows that the rates of exclusion rise significantly in some London boroughs – particularly in Inner City boroughs associated with high levels of poverty and other social disadvantage.  In one area 1 in every 54 pupils were in pupil referral units for excluded children.

Kiran Gill, from the IPPR who carried out the research argues that the most vulnerable children with the most complex needs are disproportionately affected by exclusion, and London has no shortage of them.

Exclusion is correlated with multiple and overlapping layers of disadvantage.

Kiran Gill, IPPR

One of the factors identified in the article as driving the exclusions was the pressure schools feel to perform in league tables.  Is there a danger that the Scottish Government’s national standardised testing (which was this week disowned by international educational experts)could lead to similar pressures – and a similar increase in exclusions?

In reading this article, I was reminded of the presentation from Linda O’Neill and Lizzie Morton from CELCIS, speaking at the Differabled Scotland seminar on exclusions last October – highlighting the much greater rate of exclusion for looked after children, and the prevalence of informal exclusions.  A report of that seminar should be available soon, if you missed it.

You can also find out more about school exclusions in Scotland and the legal position specifically in my third newsletter, which has a focus on exclusion from school.  You can access the newsletter using mailchimp and subscribe for future editions.

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