Too many children with autism are let down by schools and end up in prison

By Chrissie Rogers, Professor of Sociology, University of Bradford

 

For many young people, school can be a difficult place. And for some, it can be just about impossible. Negative experiences in school can have harmful long-term effects on pupils with autism spectrum conditions.

Official figures show that children, are increasingly being suspended or expelled from school because of “behavioural problems” – many of which include children on the autism spectrum. Some regions in the UK have experienced a 100% increase in these types of exclusions since 2011.

So despite policy rhetoric on “inclusive education” – where children ought to be educated in mainstream schools – recent figures show school exclusions are increasing: from 6,685 pupils to 7,720 between 2015-2016 and 2016-2017.

In my current research I interviewed mothers of adult children with autism and other social, emotional and mental health problems. They told me how their young sons had been a challenge in school. And how despite their requests for help, their sons received little support and ended up in the criminal justice system.

Estimates suggest that 30% of prisoners have a learning difficulty or disability and 60% have problems with communication – though this is arguably a conservative estimate, as many inmates choose to hide their disabling condition.

No help or support

Mothers in my research talked to me about how their sons were “different”. They were violent to other children and teachers as well as their own families.

All the mothers told me they felt something was “not quite right” with their child. And because the support was not forthcoming at school, this negative behaviour escalated and then as these boys got older, they ended up in prison.

One mum, Sorcha, told me her son “was made out to be the demon child of the school. He had his first exclusion in September 2004, so he was about 10 then”. Another mum, Elaine, spoke of her son Harry: “He was a difficult child for school, he’s disruptive [and] was getting into so much trouble.”

Many schools are failing to meet the needs of autistic children.
Shutterstock

Udele, explained how she had received a call from the headmistress, to fetch her son after he assaulted a teacher. “I went, you’d better call the police then. He was 10”.

Failed by the system

But a lack of support was not just isolated to the families. One senior teacher who works in a “special school” explained how hard it is to help. She said that the combination of puberty and autism can make things very difficult:

At the age of 14 there’s so much going on for them. One boy got bad grades and didn’t know what to do. He got involved with another pupil who had been excluded and was waving a knife – he got arrested.

The mothers also spoke to me about their experiences of the criminal justice system. Trudy explained how, when her son was on remand, she “felt squeezed from both sides”. She said:

My instincts were telling me that my son was getting worse and that we needed help and the professionals were telling me he was fine.

Another mother, Elaine, told me how she was “totally broken”:

I just feel like I’m standing on the edge of the cliff and I don’t know if I’m going to fall. It’s scary.

The mothers in my research all spoke of the overwhelming challenges of dealing with their child’s disability while moving through the bureaucracy and barriers if the school and criminal justice systems.

They spoke of a lack of support, lack of access to professional help and an overwhelming lack of understanding about their son’s disability, and the impact this had on their lives.

The problem with education

Under the current UK education system – where everything is based on grades and targets – there is little room for children who disrupt the smooth running of the school. These children are all-too often excluded and made to feel that they are worthless – as one teacher explained:

One kid wanted to go back into mainstream [school], but by the time he was 15, he realised this wasn’t going to happen – he ended up in prison.

For as long as education focuses solely on academic achievement and continues to demand results rather than learning, children and their families will continue to be failed by the system. And, as my research shows, once a criminal pathway is trodden, it is incredibly difficult to find a way out.




Read more:
Britain’s criminal justice system doesn’t know what to do about autism


This means those who need support the most often end up incarcerated. Both Elaine and Udele’s sons (still now only in their 20s), were in “special schools” and continue to be in and out of the criminal justice system. I interviewed Elaine three times and her son Harry, once. Between her interviews, Harry returned to prison.

Rethinking learning

If more support and intervention in the education system was to occur before the police got involved, then these young people would be less likely to end up incarcerated and at the bottom of a human hierarchy.

But for this to happen, there needs to be a rethink of what education is actually about. Because it is clear that the restrictive and damaging nature of the current system just doesn’t work for some pupils.

If instead, schools could help children to learn creatively and open up their minds to new possibilities outside of tests and league tables, then it is likely that more children would stand a better chance of staying out of the criminal justice system and reaching their full potential.The Conversation

Chrissie Rogers, Professor of Sociology, University of Bradford

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Advertisements

Exclusion and disadvantage – a warning from London

An interesting and disturbing article I cam across recently in the Guardian: “Inner London students placed in excluded pupils’ schools almost double national rate” – which reveals statistics on exclusion from within London.

London’s schools are some of the highest performing in England and Wales, following the innovative London Challenge programme – which has in turn inspired the Scottish Government’s attainment challenge.

Research in London’s schools shows that the rates of exclusion rise significantly in some London boroughs – particularly in Inner City boroughs associated with high levels of poverty and other social disadvantage.  In one area 1 in every 54 pupils were in pupil referral units for excluded children.

Kiran Gill, from the IPPR who carried out the research argues that the most vulnerable children with the most complex needs are disproportionately affected by exclusion, and London has no shortage of them.

Exclusion is correlated with multiple and overlapping layers of disadvantage.

Kiran Gill, IPPR

One of the factors identified in the article as driving the exclusions was the pressure schools feel to perform in league tables.  Is there a danger that the Scottish Government’s national standardised testing (which was this week disowned by international educational experts)could lead to similar pressures – and a similar increase in exclusions?

In reading this article, I was reminded of the presentation from Linda O’Neill and Lizzie Morton from CELCIS, speaking at the Differabled Scotland seminar on exclusions last October – highlighting the much greater rate of exclusion for looked after children, and the prevalence of informal exclusions.  A report of that seminar should be available soon, if you missed it.

You can also find out more about school exclusions in Scotland and the legal position specifically in my third newsletter, which has a focus on exclusion from school.  You can access the newsletter using mailchimp and subscribe for future editions.

Notes from the end of the year

Today was my first day back at work, which is always a bit of a difficult gear change.  It was also the first day back at school for many pupils and teachers.

I am not one for New Year’s Resolutions in general, but I do want to post to the main blog more often in 2019, so I will start as I mean to go on …

This post is a bit of a round up of a few things that I wanted to write about towards the end of last year, but didn’t get around to.  So, I will just summarise them here, with the relevant links for you.  It is possible that I will return to some of these in due course, but then again, who knows?

  • The Scottish Commission for Learning Disability released their 2018 report.  The 2018 Learning Disability Statistics Scotland provides data on adults with learning disabilities from local authorities across Scotland.  The report is provisional, as Glasgow City Council’s returns were late.
  • The Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland published the report “No Safe Space” following a national investigation into the use of restraint and seclusion in Scotland’s schools.  It recommended (among other things) that the Scottish Government should publish a rights-based national policy and guidance on restraint and seclusion in schools. Children and young people should be involved at all stages of this process to inform its development.
  • On a similar theme, a pupil in Yorkshire has brought legal action against his school over the use of “consequence rooms” containing booths in which children sit in silence for hours as punishment for breaking school rules.  The article in the Guardian gives the details of the case, including the Dept. for Education’s response.
  • It was reported in TESS in December that due to a variety of terms being used for support staff, there is no way of monitoring levels of staffing for pupils with additional support needs.  The article: “Have support-staff numbers dropped? Who knows?” quotes Green MSP Ross Greer as describing the term pupil support assistant as “comically generalised”.  This seemed to me to be a bit of a non-story as the idea that you can quantify number of ASN staff within a mainstream school context is counter-intuitive.  The better additional support needs are understood and supported by all staff, the fewer dedicated ASN staff will be required – so a drop in these numbers should be a good thing, right?
  • The campaign for funded nursery places for deferred pupils, Give Them Time, had a useful blog piece outlining the right to defer in Scotland: “To Defer or not to Defer?
  • The UK Supreme Court delivered a judgement about Section 15 of the Equality Act 2010 (Discrimination arising from disability) in the case of Williams v. Trustees of Swansea University Pension and Assurance Scheme [2018] UKSC 65. Though not an education case, the principles apply – helpfully, the Court confirmed “the relatively low threshold of disadvantage which is sufficient to trigger the requirement to justify under this section.”
  • The Herald carried an article on Boxing Day which reported on the “Demand for radical overhaul of controversial policy on vulnerable pupils.” which quoted several sources questioning the implementation of the presumption of mainstreaming and some of the consequences thereof.  The Cabinet Secretary for Education reiterated the Government’s support for the presumption of mainstreaming.  I think most are agreed that it is not the policy which requires to be overhauled, but its funding and implementation.  (I also think the legal drafting could do with some work, but that’s another story)
  • My third newsletter hit the digital presses just before the end of term, with a focus on exclusion from school.  You can access the newsletter using mailchimp and subscribe for future editions.

And that’s it for now.  Let me know in the comments any topics you’d like to see covered here or in the newsletter.

Additional Support Needs Update (Issue 3)

The latest newsletter is now available to download. Do please read it, share it and subscribe for future editions.

This edition looks in detail at exclusions from school, with a particular focus on autism and disability and a list of reminders for exclusion appeals.  The support spotlight this edition is on Children in the Highlands Information Point (CHIP+).

Do let me know what you think about the newsletter in the comments.

Additional Support Needs Update (issue 3)

 

Autism, Disability and School Exclusions

Regular readers of this blog and my Additional Support Needs Update newsletter may recall a case in which a mother successfully claimed against Glasgow City Council for discriminating against her son, who has an Autistic Spectrum Disorder. The nub of that case was that he had been excluded, to the detriment of his mental health, for behaviour related to his disability. The behaviour in question included occasions when he was distressed, and when feeling cornered, he could lash out.

The Tribunal, in that case, was satisfied that the child met the definition of a disabled person for the purposes of Section 6 of the Equality Act 2010. This meant that the protection against discrimination afforded by the Equality Act came into play, and the education authority had an obligation to make reasonable adjustments for him in school.

The reasoning of the Tribunal seems straightforward. The child had a disability, and the behaviours linked with it were protected by the Act. However, as often is the case, the law is not as straightforward as it could be. There are situations where being a disabled person in terms of the Act may not offer universal protection. Although all disabilities should be treated equally, some are more equal than others.

The Regulation 4 exception

Reg 4 of the Equality Act 2010 (Disability) Regulations 2010 sets out conditions that are not to be treated as impairments or disabilities – including things like voyeurism and a tendency to set fires. One such exception at Reg 4(1)(c) is “a tendency to physical .. abuse of other people”. Guidance issued in May 2011 makes it clear that this exclusion applies not only where such behaviour constitutes an impairment in itself, but where it “arises as a consequence of, or a manifestation of, an impairment that constitutes a disability for the purposes of the Act”. In the latter circumstance, the behaviour that falls within the exception will be excluded from protection, but the rest of the effects of the disability will be covered.

Put simply, where your child has a condition which manifests itself in a number of ways, including physical outbursts, they will be protected by the Act except where any discrimination they may experience is as a result of the physical outbursts (if the outbursts amount to a tendency to physical abuse). Those are an excluded condition under the Act.

Even if your child, like the child in the Glasgow City Council case, is excluded because the school environment leads to a violent response, you may find that there is a barrier to challenging that exclusion.

Human Rights for all

You may be thinking that that does not seem in the spirit of the Act – and you would, in my view, be right. Although it was not an argument that ultimately required to be decided in the Glasgow City Council case, it was one I made in front of the Tribunal – in that case and in others.

Now, however, the matter has been put determined in a recent Upper Tribunal decision in England: C & C v The Governing Body of a School (SEN) [2018] UKUT 269.

The child, in this case, had autism, anxiety and Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA). The appeal concerned a fixed term exclusion from the school for 1.5 days. The reason given for the exclusion was ‘aggressive behaviour’. The First Tier Tribunal dismissed the claim as although it considered that the child generally met the definition of a disabled person, he had been given the exclusion as a result of his ‘tendency to physical abuse’.

The family appealed on the basis that Reg 4(1)(c) should be disapplied to avoid a breach of Article 14 of the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. Article 14 provides that the enjoyment of the rights conferred by the Convention should be secured without discrimination. One of the rights covered by the Convention is the right to education (in Article 2 of the First Protocol).

The Upper Tribunal agreed that Reg 4(1)(c) applied to both freestanding conditions as well as conditions arising in consequence of protected impairments. While there may be good social policy reasons to exclude free standing conditions ‘that are not generally recognised as disabilities’, the Secretary of State failed to justify, in the context of education, maintaining a provision:

“which excludes from the ambit of the protection of the Equality Act children whose behaviour in school is a manifestation of the very condition which calls for special educational provision to be made for them.”

The decision making process was fortified by the belief of officials, set out in a discussion paper in October 2017 and produced to the Tribunal, ‘that there would be fewer exclusions of disabled children from school if regulation 4(1)(c) applied only to free-standing conditions’

For those reasons, the Tribunal found that, in the context of education, regulation 4(1)(c) of the 2010 Regulations violates the Convention, and should not be applied in the circumstances of this particular case.

So, what now?

This is a decision of great significance across Great Britain. In Scotland, exclusion rates for children with additional support needs are twice those of children who don’t require support. In England and Wales, a child with a disability is seven times more likely to be permanently excluded. It is hoped that this judgement will lead to schools thinking twice before resorting to exclusion, and to more appropriate supports being put in place by budget holders at authority and government levels.

The decision does not mean that disabled children cannot be excluded for violent behaviour, simply that the school must be able to justify in law any such exclusions. Education authorities in Scotland should also consider their exclusion practices more generally, as higher rates of exclusion for disabled pupils may leave them vulnerable to indirect discrimination claims as well.

It is encouraging that the Westminister Government seem to be considering an amendment to the Regulation. Hopefully, this judgement will speed that up. With Brexit putting the UK’s commitment to the Convention in doubt, having this concession enshrined in statute would offer some peace of mind to families with disabled children.

Mainstreaming, presumably.

The passing of the Standards in Scotland’s Schools etc. Act 2000 brought with it a statutory requirement for education authorities to provide education for all in mainstream schools unless certain exceptions applied. This is known as the “presumption of mainstreaming”.

Since then, there have been many changes in education law in Scotland. As such the legislative framework now requires education authorities to consider a wide range of issues alongside the presumption of mainstream education. When considering placements for children, authorities need to consider: the need to make provision of additional support to children and young people with additional support needs; the need to avoid discrimination (including disability discrimination) and to comply with their public sector equality duty; the need to plan for improving accessibility of all aspects of school life (Education (Disability Strategies and Pupils’ Educational Records) (Scotland) Act 2002); and to consider the wellbeing of children and young people (Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014 – still to be brought into force).

The Scottish Government remain committed to a presumption of mainstreaming, and this consultation sets out draft guidance for education authorities. According to the Scottish Government:

“This non-statutory guidance will present a vision for mainstreaming, building on the best available evidence on inclusive approaches to education. It will aim to touch upon other, complementary policies as part of a joined-up approach. The guidance has been developed to support all local authorities, all schools, and all teachers and practitioners.”

The four key principles are to:

  • Improve outcomes
  • Meet the needs of all children and young people
  • Support and empower children, young people and all those involved in their education.
  • Outline an inclusive approach which identifies and addresses barriers to learning for all children.

So, does it do that?

The principles outlined above do support a wider goal of inclusion. However, the key features outlined to support these principles often fall short of promoting true inclusion. A strengthening of the wording of the expectations is required to create clear and unambiguous guidance for local authorities.

The guidance does seem to deal in generalities and overlooks the fact that decisions require to be made about an individual and their particular needs and circumstances. Mainstream education requires to be properly supported (and resourced) to ensure it is properly inclusive, while recognising that it will not be the answer for everyone.

My view is that the guidance requires to focus on the needs of the individual child in order to achieve the inclusion goals set out by the Scottish Government.

For further comments on the guidance as currently drafted, please see my full consultation response, below.

Continue reading “Mainstreaming, presumably.”

Excluded from school – what next?

The research evidence on exclusions from school make for grim reading.

The 2013 Edinburgh Study on Youth Transition and Crime found that pupils who were excluded from school at age twelve were four times more likely to be jailed as adults.

Boys, children living in single parent families, and pupils from the poorest communities were most likely to be excluded from school. Equally badly behaved pupils from more affluent areas and those from two parent families were accorded greater tolerance and, as a consequence, were far less likely to be expelled.

The study findings show that one of the keys to tackling Scotland’s high imprisonment rates is to tackle school exclusion. If we could find more imaginative ways of retaining the most challenging children in mainstream education, and ensuring that school is a positive experience for all Scotland’s young people, this would be a major step forward.
– Professor Susan McVie, Co-director of the study

Additionally, Scottish Government statistics from December 2015 reveal that pupils with additional support needs are more than four times more likely to be excluded than pupils with no additional support needs.

And all of this records only formal exclusions, for which there is a paper trail. By definition, the use of “informal exclusions”, cooling off periods, invitations to remove a child, part-time timetables and other means of denying a child their right to education – are not recorded and therefore not widely understood. Anecdotally, this affects children with additional support needs and/or disabilities disproportionately.

Parents (and children with capacity – usually aged 12 or over) have a right of appeal against a school exclusion, whether it is a temporary exclusion or a removal from the school roll.

As things stand, an appeal will be heard, in the first instance, by the education appeal committee. After that, the parent, young person or child has a further right of appeal to the Sheriff Court. The appeal committee has the power to confirm or overturn the exclusion, and to vary any conditions for readmission. The Sheriff, on appeal, has the same powers.

In terms of the Tribunals (Scotland) Act 2014, this jurisdiction will be transferred to the First-Tier Tribunal for Scotland in due course – which is a very welcome change. A right of further appeal will lie to the Upper Tribunal for Scotland. This should make the process of appeal more transparent, independent and accessible.

The right of appeal only applies in relation to public schools, i.e. those managed by the local authority – although some independent schools may have equivalent procedure in place (e.g. an appeal to the board of governors).

Where the excluded child has a disability, an exclusion from school may amount to unlawful disability discrimination in terms of the Equality Act 2010. This is a complex piece of legislation and it can be difficult to tell without specific legal advice whether an act of discrimination has taken place.

A disability claim can be made in respect of any school exclusion, whether the school is an independent, grant-aided or education authority school. Such claims must be made within six months of the exclusion, and are heard by the Additional Support Needs Tribunals for Scotland. The Tribunals have much broader powers that the appeal committee, which might include ordering an apology, staff training, a change in the school’s (or Council’s) policy on exclusions etc. The Tribunal cannot, however, make an order for compensation.

Where a child with additional support needs has been excluded from school, do remember that there are routes by which that decision can be challenged. Particularly where the use of exclusion has become commonplace or is adversely affecting the child’s education or wellbeing, an appeal or a disability claim may be well worth considering.